News

Local News airs at 6:00am | 6:30am | 7:00am | 7:30am | 8:00am | 12:05pm |

Man Charged 10th Time for Driving on Revoked

Christopher Charles Shaw... Photo provided the CCSD

Christopher Charles Shaw… Photo provided the CCSD

On Monday, Manchester Officer Dustan Foster stopped a vehicle for a traffic violation on I-24 at mile-marker 106. Foster said that he saw the male driver on Highway 55 at the Raider Academy and checked the registration. The communication center gave the registration belonging to a Honda CRV, but the tag was displayed on an Oldsmobile. Foster checked the man’s driving status and found that Christopher Charles Shaw age 42 of Aspen Hill in Fayetteville was allegedly driving on a revoked license. This would be Shaw’s 10th offense. He is also listed as a habitual traffic offender.
Shaw’s bond was set at $19,000 and he’ll be in court on May 10, 2016.

Behind Bars: 1 in 10 TN Children Has an Incarcerated Parent

Improving access to community support for children and families of incarcerated parents can help lesson the lifelong impact of jail time on generations, according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (kconnors/flickr.com)

Improving access to community support for children and families of incarcerated parents can help lesson the lifelong impact of jail time on generations, according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation. (kconnors/flickr.com)

One in 10 children in Tennessee has had an incarcerated parent – equating to 144,000 children facing at least part of their childhood without them. That’s according to a report released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The Volunteer State is tied with five other states for the third-highest prevalence of parental incarceration.
Linda O’Neal, executive director for the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, explains why the rate is so high.
“One of the challenges in Tennessee is, we need to take a look at our criminal justice system and be sure we’re saving those resources for people who are really a danger to society,” says O’Neal. “Our system too frequently incarcerates people for relatively minor offenses or probation violations, when they’re really not a threat to society.”
O’Neal says in recent years the state has made some progress in providing more mental-health and substance-abuse treatment, as opposed to incarceration for some people, but there is more work to be done.
Among the recommendations in the report is considering children and families in the sentencing decision, providing communities with resources to support impacted families, and providing financial support to children and families during confinement.
Scot Spencer, associate director for advocacy and influence for the Annie E. Casey Foundation says early-education centers, schools, child welfare agencies, community-based health centers and other local and faith-based organizations should offer programs that foster children’s mental and emotional well-being.
“There is the potential for the ‘quiet whispers’ that may not be so quiet that a child would hear about a missing parent,” Spencer says. “And so, supporting those centers to be able to provide the services and the knowledge, so that they can be equipped to help that child navigate the tough times.”
O’Neal says addressing the issues created for children with incarcerated parents is a proactive way to make sure the cycle doesn’t continue.
“We know when parents are incarcerated, it provides toxic stress for the developing brains of young children and it often goes along with other stressors like mental illness or substance abuse or child abuse,” says O’Neal. “And we really need to prevent those from occurring whenever possible.”
The Casey report says inmates make from 40 cents to $1 a day for their work, making it impossible for them to save enough money to help sustain themselves and their children after their release.

Dixie Line Days is Friday and Saturday

Lionel-TrainDixie Line Days is coming to Wartrace this Friday and Saturday April 29th and 30th. It’s a festival of trains large and small with operating model railroads, dealer swap tables, model contests, and how-to clinics. The train show takes place in several locations in downtown Wartrace from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM on Friday and from 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM on Saturday.
Photographers and book authors will make their presentations on Saturday from 10:30 AM to 2:00 PM in the Smith House Dinner Theater downtown.
The full sized trains of CSX Transportation will also make occasional appearances through the heart of downtown. For more information call 1-800-465-0448 or visit www.dixieflyertrains.com.

Mother and Daughter Arrested on Burglary Charges

Shelby Leanne Lacewell... Photos provided by the CCSD

Shelby Leanne Lacewell… Photos provided by the CCSD

On Friday morning the Coffee County Department received a report of a burglary in progress at 61 Bush Lane. A female apparently was seen running from the home down Gnat Hill Road. The woman was found a short distance from the residence. When deputies checked the woman, identified as Shelby Leanne Lacewell age 24 of Lee Cox Lane Manchester, she was allegedly found to be in possession of property that had been removed from the home on Bush Lane. When deputies went to 61 Bush Lane they found the residence to have been burglarized with additional property sitting beside the front porch, including a safe. The arrest warrant says that Lacewell was identified as the person involved in the burglary.
A vehicle was stopped a short distance from the burglary and Shelby Lacewell allegedly told authorities that the driver, Regina Woodlee Lacewell age 54 of Lee Cox Lane Manchester was her mother. Shelby stated that her mother dropped her off at the residence and was to return and pick up the items taken. The warrant goes onto to say that by dropping off her daughter, this action shows her conspiring to assist in the burglary.
Shelby Leanne Lacewell was charged with aggravated burglary, theft of property and violation of probation. Her bond was set at $51,000 and she’ll be in court on Tuesday on the violation charge and in May on the other charges.
Regina Woodlee Lacewell

Regina Woodlee Lacewell


Regina Woodlee Lacewell was charged with criminal attempt with her bond set at $50,000 and she’ll be in court 5-9-16.
Coffee County Sheriff’s Department Investigator Kelly Smith charged both women.
The two women are also being questioned about possibly being involved in other burglaries.

Arbor Day in Tullahoma

Arbor dayThe City of Tullahoma will observe Arbor Day on National Arbor Day, Friday, April 29, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. The public is invited to attend the ceremony to celebrate:

• National Arbor Day
• Tullahoma award of Tree City USA for the 19th consecutive year
• Certification of the City’s first Arboretum
• Tullahoma Utility Board’s award of Tree Line USA
The ceremony will be held at the Sunrise Rotary Disc Golf Course at East Park located behind East Middle School. This is also the location of the arboretum which has been named East Park Arboretum.
Mayor Curlee will read the Arbor Day proclamation and introduce the speakers.
Steven Rogers, Forestry Technician Coffee & Warren County, Tennessee Division of Forestry, will present the City with its 19th consecutive Tree City USA Award. To qualify for Tree City USA (administered by the Arbor Day Foundation), a City must have
• A Tree Board
• A tree care ordinance
• A community forestry program with an annual budget of at least $2 per capita
• An Arbor Day observance and proclamation
Ralph Graham, Chairman of the Tullahoma Tree Board, will recognize Sunrise Rotary President Greg Sandlin for the Club’s contributions toward the arboretum, and will recognize former City Forester J. P. Kraft and current Forester Ian Anderson for their work in making this arboretum possible. He will also provide a brief history of events leading to certification of East Park Arboretum.
The Tullahoma Noon Rotary Club purchased 11 memorial trees for deceased members and agree to their being incorporated into the arboretum and to the Tree Board’s recommended tree species. This brought the total number of trees to 41 and the species to 34.

Concert at Motlow

Motlow 3The Motlow State Community College vocal ensemble and community jazz ensemble will perform at the free, annual Spring Concert on Apr. 26 & 28. The concerts will be on the Moore County campus in Eoff Hall, Powers Auditorium, according to Dr. David Bethea, Motlow music professor.
The Tuesday, Apr. 26 performance is scheduled for 12:30 p.m., and the Thursday performance is scheduled for 7 p.m., with pre-concert refreshments being served at 6 p.m. There is no admission charge, but donations are welcome and will help support the Motlow music department. To make a reservation, please contact Bobbie Underwood, humanities department secretary, at 931-393-1700, or email bunderwood@mscc.edu, or stop by her office in Simon Hall, Room 114.

April is Donate Life Month

April is Donate MonthThis is a reminder about this Thursday’s “Green Out” softball game at Terry Floyd Field at the high school. The game is between our Lady Raiders and the Oakland Lady Patriots. This night is a night of Organ Donation Awareness. It is Donate Life month. Please come out to the field and wear your green. We want as many there as we can get. The ceremonies will start at 6:00pm. There will be special guests from Nashville to answer all you questions at their booth, and there will be free gifts.
All of those who have received a transplant of any kind and all of those who are on a transplant waiting list, please attend. Only 38% of Tennesseans are signed up to be organ donors. Wear something green, the color for Organ Donation Awareness.
Thunder Radio will be broadcasting live.

Local Attorney Receives Censure

lawyer2On April 20, Cathleen Grady Conley, an attorney licensed to practice law in Tennessee, received a Public Censure from the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Tennessee Supreme Court. Conley’s office is located at 200 N. Washington St. in Tullahoma.
To obtain business, Conley’s office staff reviewed bankruptcy court records and phoned creditors who had not yet filed a proof of claim, according to a release from the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Tennessee Supreme Court. If the creditor expressed interest over the telephone, Conley’s staff sent an email with a claim form and an agreement providing that Conley would receive one third of any money recovered from the debtor. The phone call and email did not explain that Conley would not be acting as an attorney or provide notice that the protections of the client-lawyer relationship did not exist. Conley was thereby subject to the rules of professional conduct and violated the rules relating to the solicitation of potential clients.
By these acts, Conley violated Rules of Professional Conduct 5.7 (responsibilities regarding law-related services) and 7.3 (solicitation of potential clients) and is hereby Publicly Censured for these violations.
A Public Censure is a rebuke and warning to the attorney, but it does not affect the attorney’s ability to practice law.
Conley and been an attorney since 1976.

Coffee County Unemployment Rate Drops

unemployment3County unemployment rates for March 2016, show the rates decreased in 92 counties, increased in one, and remained the same in two counties.
Coffee County dropped from a February rate of 4.2 percent to a March rate of 4%. In neighboring counties; Bedford fell from 4.4 to 4.1, Cannon County went down from 4.3 percent in February to 4% in March, Franklin County dropped from 4.2 to 3.9%, Grundy County’s unemployment in February was 6 percent falling to 5.6% in March, Moore County stayed the same at 3.4% and Warren County fell from 4.3% to 4%. Williamson County had lowest unemployment rate 2.8%.

2014 State Amendment to be Recounted

abortionA federal judge has ordered a recount of votes on a 2014 amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that made it easier to put restrictions on abortion.
On Friday, U.S. District Judge Kevin Sharp said the method that was used to count the votes was fundamentally unfair to the eight Tennessee voters who filed a lawsuit against state officials. They have maintained that the state incorrectly interpreted the way the votes should be counted and tallied them in favor of abortion opponents.
A spokesman for state election officials said in an email that he could not comment on pending litigation.
Sharp ordered officials to recount the votes to determine whether the constitutional amendment passed by a majority of voters who cast ballots in the governor’s race.

Older posts «

» Newer posts