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Tullahoma High School Placed On Lockdown On Thursday

Tullahoma High lockdownTullahoma High School was put on lockdown Thursday afternoon following a report of a student in the school with a gun.
Apparently a student reported that another student had a handgun in his or her pocket just after 1 p.m.

Tullahoma PD officer with his rifle pointed up at ready talking on phone outside THS during the lockdown. Tullahoma Police on the scene during Thursday's lockdown.. Please credit Norris Carden - Carden Photography.

Tullahoma PD officer with his rifle pointed up at ready talking on phone outside THS during the lockdown.
Tullahoma Police on the scene during Thursday’s lockdown.. Please credit Norris Carden – Carden Photography.

The Tullahoma Police Department reported to the scene and began questioning students. It was discovered that the possible gun was actually an airsoft prop gun from the school’s drama class.
Dr Dan Lawson Director of Tullahoma schools said the system partnered with police to secure the area and bring the situation to a close.
The school was placed on lockdown as a precaution and was taken off at 2:30pm.

Safe Streets USA Report Says Manchester Is Dangerous– Police Chief Disagrees

Manchester Police Chief Mark Yother.

Manchester Police Chief Mark Yother.

The security company Safe Streets USA, which specializes in home and business security has released their list of the Top 17 Tennessee cities considered the most dangerous. The company says they used the most recent FBI Uniform Crime Report, combining both violent and property crimes when making the rankings.
1. Crossville: Crime rate of 117 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in nine chance of being a crime victim.
2. Athens: Crime rate of 99 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in ten chance of being a crime victim.
3. Memphis: Crime rate of 81 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in twelve chance of being a crime victim.
4. Dyersburg: Crime rate of 77 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in thirteen chance of being a crime victim.
5. Knoxville: Crime rate of 77 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in thirteen chance of being a crime victim.
6. Greenville: Crime rate of 74 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in fourteen chance of being a crime victim.
7. Manchester: Crime rate of 67 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in fifteen chance of being a crime victim.
Manchester Police Chief Mark Yother says his department is very aggressive when it comes to solving crimes and bringing people to justice. Yother says the MPD has a very high solvability rate on reported crime which makes Manchester a safer place to live. He says numbers can be skewed because of how much a department reports the crimes it has.
8. Kingsport: Crime rate of 67 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in fifteen chance of being a crime victim.
9. Jackson: Crime rate of 64 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in sixteen chance of being a crime victim.
10. Cleveland: Crime rate of 62 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in sixteen chance of being a crime victim.
11. Springfield: Crime rate of 57 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in seventeen chance of being a crime victim.
12. East Ridge: Crime rate of 56 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in eighteen chance of being a crime victim.
13. McMinnville: Crime rate of 55 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in eighteen chance of being a crime victim.
14. Nashville: Crime rate of 54 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in eighteen chance of being a crime victim.
15. Brownsville: Crime rate of 52 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in nineteen chance of being a crime victim.
16. Lebanon: Crime rate of 49 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in twenty chance of being a crime victim.
17. Columbia: Crime rate of 48 per 1,000 residents. You have a one in twenty one chance of being a crime victim.
(Portions of this story from WZTV)

Grants Available To Help Tennesseans Get More Education and Training For Jobs

Gov. Bill Haslam

Gov. Bill Haslam

Gov. Bill Haslam has announced a new statewide initiative to help residents get more education and training for jobs that are available in their communities.
Haslam says the Tennessee Higher Education Commission is accepting applications from partnerships across the state for $10 million in grants from the Labor Education Alignment Program. Applicants must represent a partnership between a local economic development agency, a community college, the local school district and at least two employers.
The program is part of Haslam’s “Drive to 55″ campaign to help residents get an education or other training beyond high school. He says that will allow them to “get better jobs and create better lives.”
The competition for grant money is open through Nov. 17. Applicants can apply for up to $1 million.

New Incentives For MTSU Students

MTSU3Middle Tennessee State University is changing its financial aid package to encourage students to graduate in four years.
The university announced on Wednesday that it will supplement the Hope Lottery Scholarships of students who stay on track to graduate. The school will pay $500 to Hope scholarship students after each of their first two years.
The school also will pay what it calls a “Finish Line Scholarship” to graduating seniors. That scholarship will return any tuition increases the student paid over the four years.
In addition, MTSU will begin guaranteeing Transfer Academic Scholarships to all qualifying students from the state’s 14 community colleges.
And the school is lowering the minimum ACT scores required to qualify for five major scholarships.
The changes take place fall 2015.
For more information, visit mtsu.edu/apply.

Scholarship Saturday Is September 20 At Motlow

Tn PromiseTennessee high school seniors who plan to graduate in 2015 are invited to attend “Scholarship Saturday” at the Motlow College Moore County campus on Sept. 20. The event will be held inside the Clayton-Glass Library from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
“Scholarship Saturday” is designed for Tennessee high school seniors to apply for the Tennessee Promise, which allows 2015 graduates to attend Motlow College tuition-free. The Motlow admissions application fee of $25 will be waived for high school seniors who attend the session and complete both applications. Free pizza and soft drinks will also be available to those who complete both applications.
The Tennessee Promise is an opportunity for all graduating Tennessee high school seniors – regardless of academic or income status – to obtain an associate degree or a technical certificate free of tuition and fees.
The deadline for Tennessee high school seniors to apply for the Tennessee Promise is Nov. 1. The Tennessee Promise is available to Tennessee high school seniors throughout the Motlow College 11-county service area, without an academic or income requirement. Complete information for future Motlow College students who will attend utilizing the Tennessee Promise is available at TNpromise.mscc.edu.

The Final Days Of The 2014 Coffee County Fair

Coffee County Fair 2014Friday, September 19
11:00 AM Youth Day Field Events
5:00, 7:00, & 8:30 PM Nick’s Kids Show
5:00 PM-6:00 PM Front Porch (Macy Tabor and Branson Wells)
6:00 PM to 7:00 PM Front Porch (Garrett Richardson)
7:00 PM-9:00 PM Grandstand SIXTYFOUR BAND (Beatles Tribute Band)
Saturday, September 20
10:00 AM Coffee County Dog & Pet Show
5:00 & 7:00 PM Nick’s Kids Show
3:30 PM Peddle Pull
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM Front Porch (Electric Bones)
7:00 PM-9:30 PM Mule Races

Dad Returns Son To Jail

Robert Michael Holmes

Robert Michael Holmes.. Picture from the Shelbyville Times-Gazette 

Robert Michael Holmes a workhouse inmate in Bedford County walked away from road work on Tuesday. Bedford County deputies began searching the Normandy area for the man.
Holmes, 23, was wearing a blue shirt, bearing the letters ‘BCSW,’ and jeans or shorts. After he walked away from the work detail Holmes was last seen on Normandy Road and was thought to be walking the railroad toward Tullahoma.
Wednesday morning the man’s Dad brought him back to jail where he booked back in by authorities. He is facing escape charges.

Vanderbilt LifeFlight Honors Local Emergency Personnel

Manchester Fire Department.. All photos by Barry West

Manchester Fire Department.. All photos by Barry West

The 30th anniversary of Vanderbilt LifeFlight is being celebrated across the region. Liz Reeves with Vanderbilt was at the Coffee County Administrated Plaza on Tuesday evening to recognize local emergency personnel who work closely with LifeFlight.
Those receiving certificates of appreciation were:
Manchester Fire Department
Coffee County Rescue Squad
Allen Lendley and Coffee Co Emergency Management
Coffee Co. Emergency Medical Service
Tullahoma Fire Department and
Harton Regional Medical Center (See more photos below)

Rescue Squad

Rescue Squad


Coffee County Emergency Management

Coffee County Emergency Management


Coffee County Emergency Medical Service

Coffee County Emergency Medical Service


Harton Regional Medical Center

Harton Regional Medical Center

This Is National Child Passenger Safety Week

Common Car Seat Mistake: Harness Straps Too Loose and Too Low

Common Car Seat Mistake: Harness Straps Too Loose and Too Low

As part of National Child Passenger Safety Week, AAA – The Auto Club Group joins organizations nationwide to encourage parents and caregivers to make sure their children are riding in a safe seat.
“Three out of four car seats today are installed incorrectly,” said Michele Harris, director of traffic safety culture, AAA – The Auto Club Group. “Too often, we see kids who are in a car seat that’s installed incorrectly, or not using an age-appropriate booster seat. As we recognize Child Passenger Safety Week this week, it’s a timely reminder to be sure children are safe and secure in the right seat for them.”
One of the most frequent car seat mistakes is the positioning of the harness straps. If straps are too loose, children will not be properly restrained in the event of a crash. This may subject them to higher crash forces, or even ejection from the seat altogether. Harness straps should lie flat and not have any twists. The harness should be snug enough that you cannot pinch any extra material at the child’s shoulder.
With schools back in session, carpooling among parents increases, which can result in situations where children are not riding in a car seat or booster seat. A recent AAA Consumer Pulse™ survey found that 43 percent of people surveyed in Tennessee agree it’s difficult to make arrangements to have booster seats available for other people’s children.
The use of booster seats can reduce injuries by 45 percent compared to using an adult safety belt alone, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Children who have outgrown their five-point harness car seat by weight or height should use a booster seat until they reach 4’9’’, typically between the ages of 8-12.
For younger children using a five-point harness car seat, many hospitals offer car seat installation classes and car seat inspection stations provide certified child passenger safety technicians to inspect the seats to make sure they are installed properly. To find an inspection station or learn more, visit SafeSeats4Kids.AAA.com.
Statistical Statement:
The AAA Consumer Pulse™ Survey was conducted online among residents living in Tennessee from August 22 – 29, 2014. A total of 400 residents completed the survey. State results have a maximum margin of error of ± 4.9 percentage points. An overall survey responses are weighted by gender and age to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the adult population (18+) in Tennessee.

Fire Prevention Week Coming Soon

smoke-detectorWorking smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”
Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, Manchester Fire & Rescue is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, to remind local residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and testing them monthly.
According to the latest NFPA research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half. Meanwhile, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
“In a fire, seconds count,” said Amber Reed, Captain. “Roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires reported at night between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. when most people are asleep. Home smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out.”

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
  • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all do.
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
  • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.

The Manchester Fire & Rescue will be hosting activities such as free smoke alarm installations to City Residents, Fire Prevention Week Poster Contest with local schools and an open house during Fire Prevention Week to promote “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives!” Through these educational, family-oriented activities, residents can learn more about the importance of working smoke alarms and testing them monthly.
To find out more about Fire Prevention Week programs and activities in Manchester, please contact the Manchester Fire & Rescue at 931-728-2999 or fire@cityofmanchestertn.com. To learn more about smoke alarms and “Working Smoke Alarms Saves Lives”, visit NFPA’s Web site at www.firepreventionweek.org.

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